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Curtin University
Properties, Facilities & Development

Our Projects

Curtin University Yarning Circle

To get in touch or find out more, please contact the Yarning Circle Project Planning Manager, Stephanie Banaszak at stephanie.banaszak@curtin.edu.au

Project overview

The Curtin University Indigenous Learning Circle, known as the Yarning Circle, is a significant project for Curtin University and the Centre for Aboriginal Studies and contributes to Curtin’s continued action towards Reconciliation. Linking to the transformational learning and education of Noongar Culture seen at Nowanup Bush Campus, the Yarning Circle provides an outdoor venue for On Country & Integrated Learning experiences for Curtin students, staff and visitors to the Perth Campus.

Located to the east of Jack Finney Lake, the circular rammed earth seating and large steel canopy will provide the Curtin and wider communities a space to pause, meet, reflect and yarn. The location on Campus forms part of the wider Noongar cultural interpretation as it sits in the vicinity of the Living Knowledge Stream, Djridi trail – Zamia trail.

The Yarning Circle project is expected to commence construction in May 2020, with completion in early August 2020.

Artistic impression of the project Yarning Circle

Project features

  • A canopy made of a thatch-work of re-bar. The re-bar will create dappled lighting and a sense of enclosure.
  • Rammed earth seating for approximately 10 people in the inner circle, and room for up to 50 more in the outer circle.
  • The Yarning Circle will be surrounded by planters which will feature a variety of native plants, including banksias, flame peas, kangaroo paws and woolly bushes.

Project benefits

The Yarning Circle represents a cultural and educational celebration of Curtin’s Indigenous community, increasing the use of Jack Finney Lake and activating the natural oasis for learning and leisure activities. The project also strengthens the bonds between the Perth campus and the Nowanup Bush Campus, providing a conceptual link between the two.

Curtin University Architecture students, overseen by the project’s lead design consultant, were involved in the initial design development through a Work-Integrated-Learning design program.